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EDUCATION

WHY REFORM IN EDUCATION?

Education reform is needed to ensure that students are able to develop the skills necessary for success in their future careers. Currently, the education system fails to adequately prepare students for life after high school or college. We need educational reform. 
One way to do this is by focusing on fostering individual unique purpose and gifts, as well as providing opportunities for students to learn about entrepreneurship and financial literacy.

This could include implementing courses focused on developing entrepreneurial skills such as problem solving, creative and critical thinking, communication and collaboration, risk management, and financial management. Additionally, schools should provide education that promotes understanding of the economic system so students can develop an awareness of how different sectors interact with each other.

Furthermore, schools should embrace a culture of experimentation where students are encouraged to take risks and develop new ideas. This would involve creating spaces where students can explore their interests without fear of failure while learning valuable lessons from mistakes. Finally, it would be beneficial to teach students about personal finance so they can gain an understanding of how to make wise decisions with their money.

ORIGIN AND PURPOSE OF

THE CURRENT EDUCATION SYSTEM

History 

FROM THE AGRARIAN TO THE INDUSTRIAL AGE

The Agrarian Age (also known as the pre-industrial age) was a period of time in human history when agriculture was the primary means of subsistaence and the economy was largely based on farming and animal husbandry. During the agrarian age, societies were largely rural and agrarian, with small-scale production and low levels of technology. Most poeple lived in rural areas and worked as farmers, growing crops and raising livestock to feed themselves and their families. Education during this time was limited and mainly focused on agricultural practices and skills necessary for survival such as how to sow and harvest crops, care for animals and maintain equipment along with the traditions and customs of their community. School was also conducted in a local church on a Sunday which is where we get the term 'Sunday school' from. Here, children were taught about God and morality, literacy and basic arithmetic. The transition from the agrarian to the industrial age was characterised by the growth of factories, mass production and the use of new technologies such as steam power. As factories grew and production became mroe centralized, people began to move from the countryside to the cities to work in new factories. This lead to the growth of urbanisation and emergence of new social and economic structures which demanded workers.

DEMANDS OF THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

The Inustrial Revolution brought a significant need for workers, particularly in factories and mills. With the invetion of new machines and technology, production increased and more workers were needed to operate and maintain the machinery. John D. Rockefeller, one of the wealthiest men in American history and the founder of the largest oil company at the time (Standard Oil) decided to monopolise on the  and create a systematic form of 'education' that prepared people for the work force. It was Rockefeller who introduced 'assembly lines' and 'standardised work hours and work wages' (trading time for money) to the work force. 

'THE PRUSSIAN MODEL'

The current education system uses the 18th century Prussian (modern Germany) model.

The 18th century Prussian model was created by Frederick the II of Prussia (full name Frederick Gates), also known as Frederick the Great. He reformed the Prussian education system in the mid-18th century to create a more centuralised and efficient system that would produce disciplined and obedient citizens and soldiers for the state.
The Prussian education system became a model for other European countries, and many aspects of it are still present in modern education systems around the world. 
The Prussian model was also designed to create docile subjects and factory workers through a system of education and discipline known as 'the Prussian education system'.This system emphasised obedience, discipline, conformity and aimed to create a population of obedient and efficient workers for the state. 

The system was based on strict regimentation, rote learning, and constant surveillance, and it was design to instil a sense of duty and responsibility in individuals from a young age. The goal was to create a workplace that was docile compliant and willing to work long hours in factories and other industrial settings.

The introduction of the 'Prussian Education Code' in 1872 made education compulsory for all children aged 6-14. 

FREDERICH THE II AND JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER

Frederick Gates and John D. Rockefeller met in 1889, when Gates was serving as a Baptist minster in Minneapolis and Rockefeller was visiting the city on a business trip. Gates was known for his passion for social reform and Rockefeller was impressed by his intelligence and charisma. Rockefeller and Gates struck up a conversation and quickly discovered that they both had a passion for philanthropy. 

Rockefeller had recently founded the 'Rockefeller Foundation' and was looking for a partner who could help him on his business ventures to use his wealth effectively. Rockefeller created the Foundation out of the belief that philanthropy is an extremely powerful tool to influence the world. Gates was intrigued by Rockefeller's vision and agreed to become his advisor and confidant. Over the years, the two men developed a close friendship and shared a philosophy of philanthropy, which would eventually lead to the creation of the 'General Education Board'.

THE CREATION OF THE 'GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD'.

The General Education Board (GEB) was founded in 1902 by John D Rockefeller who at the time was one of the most wealthiest men in America's history. Rockefeller believed this would be an incredibly valuable way to use his vast fortune because he understood the effect that education had on an entire nation, society, economy and workforce. Frederick Gates was instrumental in the creation of the General Education Board (GEB) and was appointed by Rockefeller as the the First President of the General Education Board. Gates was a strong advocate for the Prussian education system (which adopted scientific management principles) and believed that it was the best model for American schools.  

At the time, public education was in a state of crisis as many schools were poorly funded, understaffed, overcrowded and there was no training for teachers. Rockefeller saw this as an opportunity to create a system of education that will prepare the masses for the workforce. Though he tried to appear well intended, critics soon realised that his fundings came with strings attached allowing him to dictate the direction of education.  He played a crucial role in the transformation of the American education system.

THE INFLUENCE OF THE GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD STILL EVIDENT TODAY

The GEB had a significant impacy on education in the United States. It focused on promoting the 'Prussian model' of education which emphasized discipline, obedience and standardization and was based on the education system of Prussia which is now a part of Germany. The GEB funded many education initiatives, including the establishment of teacher training programs, the development of new curriculum materials and the construction of new schools and universities. The goal of these initiatives was to create a standardised, disciplined education system that created efficient workers, not thinkers. The board helped to establish many public schools and universities and it's impact still travels until today with our current educational system. The Prussian model has been criticised for it's emphasis on conformity and obedience, and for it's failure to produce critical thinking and creativity.

The GEB played a significant role in promoting and implementing the 12 year education system in the US.  

They were also the first to introduce standardised testing on student to determine how they would perform as an employee and not as a critical thinker. 

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EDUCATION OR INDOCTRINATION?

EDUCATION

INDOCTRINATION

Education refers to the process of acquiring knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes through learning and instruction with the goal of developing critical thinking, creativity and problem solving skills. Education aims to provide children with a broad range of perspectives and ideas, encouraging them to think independently and make informed decisions.

Indoctrination refers to the process of teaching a set of beliefs or ideologies, often with the intention of promoting a particular political or religious agenda. Indoctrination aims to shape individual's beliefs and attitudes according to a specific worldview or ideology, discouraging critical thinking and independent thought.

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THE FLAWS IN OUR CURRENT SYSTEM OF EDUCATION

IT IS OUT DATED

01.

As mentioned earlier, the curent education system was designed decades ago to meet the needs of the industrial revolution and create workers as opposed to critical thinkers. It has not kept up with the changing needs of the world.

IT FOCUSES ON MEMORISATION RATHER THAN CRITICAL THINKING

02.

The current education system prioritises rote memorisation of information rather than teaching students how to think critically and solve complex problems.

IT IS TOO STANDARDISED

03.

The current education system treats all students the same using a cookie cutter approach and fails to properly tailor to their unique learning styles, interests and abilities.

04.

The current education system does not provide students with the skills they need to succeed in the modern business world such as communication, collaboration, negotiation and adaptability.

IT DOES NOT PROPERLY PREPARE STUDENTS FOR THE REAL WORLD

05.

IT IS TOO FOCUSED ON TESTS AND GRADE SCORES

The current education system places too much emphasis on grades and test scores, which leads to a narrow focus on testing skills rather than critical thinking and creativity.

06.

IT IS NOT INCLUSIVE

The current education does not always provide equal opportunites for all students, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

07.

IT IS NOT ADAPTIVE TO NEW TECHNOLOGIES

The current education system has not kept up with rapid pace of technological change, which can make it difficult for students to succceed in the modern world.

08.

IT DOES NOT PRIORITISE MENTAL HEALTH

The current education does not always provide equal opportunites for all students, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

09.

IT IS TOO EXPENSIVE

The cost of education has significantly risen in the recent years, making it inaccessible to many students.

10.

IT DOES NTO ADEQUATELY FOSTER CREATIVTIY

The current education does not always provide students with the opportunities to be creative and innovative, which can stifle their potential and limit their ability to solve somplex problems.

11.

IT IS NOT PRIORITISE PRACTICAL SKILLS

The current education system does not prioritise practical skills such as financial literacy, home economics, basic home and car maintenance, how to balance a cheque book etc. 

12.

IT DOES NTOT FOSTER A LOVE OF LEARNING

The current education can be so focused on grades and test scores that is fails to foster a love of learning in students. This can lead to students feeling burned out and disengaged.

13.

IT IS NOT PRIORITISE PRACTICAL SKILLS

The current education system does not prioritise practical skills such as financial literacy, home economics, basic home and car maintenance, how to balance a cheque book etc. 

14.

IT DOES NOT FOSTER A LOVE OF LEARNING

The current education can be so focused on grades and test scores that is fails to foster a love of learning in students. This can lead to students feeling burned out and disengaged.

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